{flv}Google_I_O_2010_Keynote_Day_1,pt.1|600|450|1{/flv}
Video footage from Day 1 keynote at Google I/O 2010
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>>> Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome vice president of engineering for Google, Vic Gundotra.
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[ Applause ] >>Vic Gundotra: Well, good morning.
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Good morning. And hello.
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On behalf of Google, let me extend a very warm welcome to all 5,000 in attendance today,
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as well as the many more thousands who are watching our first-ever live streamcast of
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this event on YouTube.com. Thank you.
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You know, it's hard to believe that this is our third Google I/O.
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It's not only our largest Google I/O, it's the one that we sold out the fastest.
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It even surprised us. Within weeks of announcing this conference,
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we sold out of this event two and a half months in advance.
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We think that speaks volumes about the level of enthusiasm that you all have for this important
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community event. And at Google, we recognize how precious and
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valuable your time is, and we're honored and grateful that you have chosen to spend two
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days here with us. We hope you find this conference exciting
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and really engaging, and we have a few surprises for you as well.
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Now, some of you may wonder, how did we name this conference?
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What does I/O stand for? Three-plus years ago, when we first thought
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about holding a developers' conference and we thought about naming the event, we contemplated
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multiple choices. We wanted a name that, most importantly, embodied
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the spirit of the Web, a spirit of collaboration. Sometimes messy, but always fun.
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A spirit of inclusiveness rather than exclusiveness. A spirit of innovation and of openness.
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And, of course, we wanted this event to appeal to developers.
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So we thought, what's the first thing a developer learns to do when they begin to code?
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Well, it's input and output. That's I/O.
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But I/O also stands for two of the most important elements of our Web culture: Innovation in
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the open. Make no mistake about it, the Web is the most
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important platform of our generation. And because it's a platform controlled by
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none of us, it's the only platform that truly belongs to all of us.
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And it's our job as a community to move that Web forward.
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And so you can imagine how pleased we were last year at this conference to focus the
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world's attention, the developer community's attention, on an important standard, HTML5.
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It was at this conference in this room last year that you can see we first started driving
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attention toward HTML5. And events later on in the year continued
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that momentum that we, as a community, started. That huge spike is YouTube's adoption of HTML5.
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That other spike is Apple's adoption. I think it was a Steve Jobs late-night e-mail
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or something. [ Laughter ]
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>>Vic Gundotra: That last spike -- [ Applause ]
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>>Vic Gundotra: Hey, we'll take support from wherever we can get it.
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That last spike included Microsoft's support for HTML5.
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As a community, working together, and collaboratively, we can move the Web forward.
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Of course, we recognize that we are far from done.
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We recognize that the Web has important challenges that we need to address as a community.
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How can we make the Web faster? How can we make Web apps as discoverable as
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you see, for example, in app stores? How can we make it easier for developers to
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monetize those applications? And, finally, can we make the Web extend its
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reach even to new form factors? We hope to show you our proposed answers to
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some of these questions at this conference. And we're very much looking forward to your
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feedback. Of course, the Web is growing up.
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It's all happening because we're working on it together.
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And we think this conference is an important part of that process.
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Before I hand off to our opening keynote speaker, let me just make two housekeeping announcements.
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The first announcement is, I hope you all enjoyed the Android devices that we sent you
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as part of registering. [ Applause ]
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[ Cheers and applause ] >>Vic Gundotra: If you have not already done
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so, please go to the Android Marketplace and download an application we specifically designed
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for you at this conference, just do a search on Google conference or Google I/O, and you'll
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find this application. This application will make it very easy for
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you to make the best use of your time and to really find the sessions that interest
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you the most. The second and last housekeeping note, tomorrow's
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keynote will not start at 9:00 a.m. It will start at 8:30 in the morning.
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I know, that's early in the morning, particularly for you developers.
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But I promise you, you will not be disappointed. We have more than one surprise tomorrow morning.
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So have fun at the party tonight, but remember, the fun starts at 8:30 tomorrow morning.
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[ Laughter ] >>Vic Gundotra: All right.
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With that, let me hand off to our opening keynote speaker, who will carry the banner
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of the open Web. Please join me in welcoming Google vice president
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of product management, Sundar Pichai. [ Applause ]
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>>Sundar Pichai:
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Thanks, Vic. It's great to be here.
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I'm going to be talking to you today about HTML5, the incredible momentum we have, all
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the new capabilities that are coming up, how modern browsers are going to support these
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APIs. We will show you real-world examples.
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We will invite application developers who are building amazing experiences on top of
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HTML5. And, finally, we will have a couple of important
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announcements on the way. So let's get started.
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First, as Vic mentioned, the Web is the most important platform of our generation.
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And from a user standpoint, people are spending more of their time on the Web.
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Compared to every other information medium out there, the Web is more than double in
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terms of the amount of time people spent in the last five years.
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Every other information medium has been the same or has declined.
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That's how important the Web is in users' lives.
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How are developers reacting to it? We started taking a look at how applications
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have been written since 1990. Most of you are familiar with the popular
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desktop applications: Microsoft Office, iTunes, Skype, Photoshop.
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The list goes on and on. These are amazing applications which we all
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use in our day-to-day lives. The interesting thing, though, is, since 2004,
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we can't come up with popular desktop applications, outside of games and browsers, that are being
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used by millions of users. What happened in 2004?
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It turned out it is the year in which Ajax and the Web 2.0 revolution happened.
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People started writing these applications as Web applications, applications which you're
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all very familiar with: GMail, Google Maps, Twitter, Facebook, et cetera.
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The world changed. The Web changed from documents to applications.
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And developers started reaching users by writing Web applications instead of desktop applications.
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So this is a powerful change. It's a very important trend.
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Given that, we need to make sure Web applications can do everything that desktop applications
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can do. You're all very familiar with this.
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Historically, desktop applications have had full access to system capabilities.
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So they could talk to the speaker, microphone, camera.
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They could access the file system, for example. Web applications have been limited in what
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they can do. This is what the HTML5 work is all about.
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We are working very hard as a community to make sure all these capabilities show up in
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the browser. Let me give a few examples.
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Most computers today ship with powerful GPUs. How do you make sure Web applications can
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access these graphics capabilities? That's what Web GL and the graphics APIs are
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all about. Workers, it is about allowing Web applications
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to access the multi-core CPUs present on the computers.
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There are APIs to access the local file system, local storage, speaker, microphone, camera,
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and the list goes on. All this matters only if browsers support
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these APIs. So let's take a look at how we are doing there.
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About 24 months ago, this had just gotten under way.
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There was pioneering work here by Firefox, Safari, Opera, and Chrome didn't even exist
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then. So this is about 24 months ago, and it had
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just gotten under way. Let's fast forward to where we were last year
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during Google I/O. You can see the momentum was there.
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Set of APIs being implemented in all modern browsers, including Chrome.
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So the progress was very exciting. So where do we expect to be by the end of
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this year? As you can see, all the major APIs are going
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to be present in all modern browsers. So --
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[ Laughter ] [ Applause ]
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>>Sundar Pichai: So U.S. developers can bank on these APIs being present in the browsers
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when users reach your applications. Another important trend is mobile.
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All of you are carrying a smart phone here today.
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The interesting thing there is, the smart phones all are connected with capable browsers.

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Автор : btamedia press